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Country-specific scores across regulations that enable, promote, and prevent financial inclusion

> Posted by Liliana Rojas-Suarez and Lucía Pacheco

The following post was originally published on the Center for Global Development’s blog and has been republished with permission.

The most recent World Bank data on financial inclusion shows that by 2014, only 54 percent of the adult population in Latin America had an account at a financial institution. This compares to an average of 62 percent of adults worldwide and 70.5 percent for those countries with a similar level of income per capita (the region’s peers). In developed economies, 94 percent of adults have an account at a financial institution.

Many factors could be cited for the low ratios of financial inclusion in Latin America, but in a recent paper published at BBVA Research, that also came as a CGD working paper, we focus on the potential role of financial regulation. We assessed and compared the quality of the policies and regulations that impinge on financial inclusion in eight Latin American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay). Peru and Mexico came out on top, with what appear to be the best regulatory frameworks for promoting financial inclusion. But even in these top performers, there is room for improvement.

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  • Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) and East and South Asia have the most conducive environments for financial inclusion. India stands out for the most progress in the last three years and is now ranked third
  • Further policy changes are needed if financial inclusion is to play the role envisioned in the Sustainable Development Goals
  • The digitization of financial services is key to increasing access to finance

The 2016 Global Microscope on Financial Inclusion shows that essential policies for bringing financial services to low-income groups are now widespread in the developing world. Nine of the 12 financial inclusion indicators covered in the benchmarking index improved globally in 2016, building on gains which have been made during the last decade. Even so, many countries have not moved significantly beyond basic policies, and greater focus is needed if financial inclusion is to play the critical role envisioned in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The Global Microscope is produced by The Economist Intelligence Unit (The EIU), with policy guidance and financial support from leading organisations in the field including the Center for Financial Inclusion at Accion. Now in its 10th year, the Microscope is the global standard for financial inclusion policy in developing economies.

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> Posted by Juan Blanco, Associate, Financial Inclusion 2020, CFI

A Spanish-language version of this post follows the English version.

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After five months of discussion, Colombia’s Financial Inclusion Bill has been approved by Congress, now only needing presidential sanction to become law. Earlier this year the country’s Minister of Treasury and Public Credit and Minister of Information Technologies and Communications filed the bill in Congress. The bill articulates a framework for the expansion of savings and payment services by engaging a wider range of providers in offering digital services.

The new law would allow for the creation of a new type of financial institution, Organizations Specialized in Electronic Deposits and Payments. These institutions can be established by individuals or legal entities, with a minimum capital requirement of $3 million, approximately 10 percent of the minimum currently required for commercial banks. The new electronic deposit and payment providers can receive capital investments from commercial banks and financial corporations.

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> Posted by Verónica Trujillo Tejada, Consultant, MIF/ Inter-American Development Bank

Building up a regulatory framework for the development of a microfinance market is a complex task. It requires taking into account a broad variety of topics as well as country specific needs and features. There are some internationally-applicable recommendations for the design of microfinance regulatory frameworks (CGAP 2012, ASBA 2010, and Basel 2010) but little is known about how different countries have implemented their guidelines or what the effects are of these rules in each market.

In the recently released paper “Microfinance Regulation and Market Development in Latin America,” published by the B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, we analyze the relationship between microfinance regulatory frameworks in 17 Latin American countries and the corresponding markets’ levels of development.

One way to characterize microfinance regulations is as either general or specific rules. The general rules are devoted to regulating typical financial system issues, while the specific rules target microfinance products or institutions. Two other regulation classifications are protection rules and promotion rules. Protection rules have the goal of preserving financial system stability or protecting the financial consumer, and promotion rules aim to favor the development of microfinance services or institutions by softening the restrictiveness of the overall regulatory framework.

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> Posted by Amanda Lotz, Financial Inclusion 2020 Project Coordinator, CFI

The Financial Inclusion 2020 campaign at the Center for Financial Inclusion at Accion is building a movement toward full financial inclusion by 2020. Accordingly, this blog series will spotlight financial inclusion efforts around the globe, share insights coming out of the creation of a roadmap to full financial inclusion, and highlight findings from research on the “invisible market.”

Just imagine for a minute. You are in your late 20’s and about to go on a second date. You are really looking forward to it; after all, your date is attractive and shares your interests. Everything seems to be going great, until your date brings up his/her excellent credit score and then asks about yours. What do you say?

A recent article in the New York Times, “Perfect 10? Never Mind That. Ask Her for Her Credit Score,” inspired this scenario. When my boyfriend and I applied for our lease, naturally we talked about credit scores, as it was a part of the application process. Luckily, we were okay. But, I can see how this could be contentious for a couple if one person has a poor credit score.

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The views and opinions expressed on this blog, except where otherwise noted, are those of the authors and guest bloggers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Center for Financial Inclusion or its affiliates.