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A look at why #FinHealthMatters in the region

> Posted by Allyse McGrath and Jeffrey Riecke, CFI

This year on Financial Health Matters Day, we at the Center for Financial Inclusion at Accion are taking a look at the new Global Findex data and what it says about the financial health of respondents around the world. Because of our recent work on financial health in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, we decided to take a closer look at the Findex numbers from the region.

The 2017 Global Findex shows a substantial increase in account ownership between 2014 and 2017, from 62 percent to 69 percent of adults. However, one indicator that has decreased across this same period is the Findex’s proxy for financial health – the resilience question. This metric measures a person’s ability to come up with emergency funds in the amount of 1/20 GNI per capita in the next month (for reference, this is a little less than $3,000 in the U.S. context, and a little less than 700 dinar in Serbia). Isolating Eastern Europe and Central Asia, the percentage of people who said they could come up with this amount actually decreased slightly from 64 percent in 2014 to 61 percent in 2017.

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Why we’re investing in Pula to support agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia

> Posted by Rob Stevens and Amee Parbhoo, Accion Venture Lab

The following post was originally published on the Accion blog

Smallholder farmers are the bedrock of sub-Saharan Africa’s and Asia’s agricultural markets, providing over 80 percent of the food supply, but they are growing increasingly vulnerable. Climate scientists estimate that over the next few decades, droughts will frequently affect Africa and Asia as a result of climate change. As weather conditions cause decreased stability for family farms, there is an increased need for risk mitigation solutions that can add security to the lives of those most affected.

Pula, one of Accion Venture Lab’s latest investments, provides insurance to smallholder farmers across Africa and India, enabling income security for a population whose livelihoods depend on climate patterns. Pula uses cutting-edge technology coupled with expansive distribution partners to make large-scale agricultural insurance feasible for rural farmers.

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> Posted by Center Staff

After great anticipation, three years’ worth to be exact, the 2017 Global Findex Database was officially released this morning. The Global Findex is the authoritative data source on global progress toward financial inclusion. Released every three years, the Global Findex surveys more than 150,000 adults in 144 economies to better understand how people access and use financial services to make payments, and also to save and borrow.

Since the 2014 Findex, the percent of the global population that has a bank account with a financial institution or mobile money service rose from 62 percent to 69 percent. Five-hundred and fifteen million individuals opened an account for the first time over the past three years, reducing the unbanked population to 1.7 billion adults worldwide. However, the new data also reveal critical shortcomings in progress. For instance, the financial inclusion gender gap didn’t improve. Globally, women remain 7 percent less likely to own a bank account than men.

Here are a few of the 2017 Global Findex’s high-level statistics:
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> Posted by Drew Corbyn and Sascha Brandt, GOGLA

The following post was originally published on the GOGLA blog and has been republished with permission.

The consumer is the central figure of the off-grid solar sector. Demand from consumers has inspired our member companies to provide an ever-growing range of quality off-grid solar energy products and services. It is thus perhaps not surprising the industry is now taking the lead in developing a sector-wide code of conduct on consumer protection. It has committed to develop and implement a set of principles on how off-grid solar companies engage with customers.

GOGLA will spearhead the project with support from the DOEN Foundation. Over the next few months, we will work with members, investors and partner organizations to compile a code of conduct. The Sustainability Working Group will serve as the main platform for members to develop and agree to the framework and how it is operationalized. Their engagement is vital in producing a practical and meaningful framework that serves as the de-facto standard for off-grid solar consumer protection.

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Which topics would you most want to see researched?

> Posted by Sonja E. Kelly, Director of Research, CFI

Hi there. I would love your help as we select topics for our 2018 CFI Fellows research.

CFI is getting ready to launch the request for proposals for our 2018 Fellows cohort (a lot of you have been asking when it’s coming out, and the answer is SOON!). The CFI Fellows Program is designed to respond to questions we think are critical to the future of financial inclusion. Fellows come from many perspectives, including both relatively junior and senior well-known researchers, and including researchers who have been in the financial inclusion community for a long time and some who are perceptive outsiders. We share a set of topics for study, and ask interested researchers to submit research proposals that address the topic of their interest.

Our semi-final list of questions is long, and we ask for your help refining or prioritizing them – or adding new ones. We’ve enabled comments at the bottom of this post for your feedback. Alternatively, feel free to email me at skelly@accion.org.

Here are the questions we are currently considering:
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It’s not just social media. We need a fresh look at how financial data is protected, too.

> Posted by Elisabeth Rhyne, Managing Director, CFI

Embed from Getty Images

Mark Zuckerberg defended Facebook’s handling of customer data yesterday before the U.S. Senate, and many of us at Accion and the Center for Financial Inclusion were riveted. Not that the testimony was especially compelling as television spectacle, but because the issues at stake are so important both for our own lives and for our work.

I did a quick scan of the staff here in our Washington, D.C. office, and would like to share some of their thoughts.

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How can an app help improve financial health? Spoiler alert: offering users sound financial advice isn’t enough!

CFI and the Microfinance Centre (MFC) in Warsaw are working together to build a smartphone-based tool to assist customers with gauging and improving their financial health.

As part of the project, we developed a simple financial health quiz that will serve as the foundation of the application, helping users not only assess their financial health, but also understand and decide on specific actions to improve it.

Last year MFC tested the quiz among the clients and staff of organizations partnering with its Borrow Wisely Campaign in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Our lessons learned from this testing phase are informing our next steps as we continue to design and build the application.

We released a new brief, “Toward a Financial Health Tool for Consumers” that distills the results of the tests and shares our lessons learned up to this stage in the project. Here’s a quick overview of our findings.

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How new product solutions, business models, and partnerships can advance electronic payments and financial inclusion

> Posted by Dan Salazar, Vice President, Product Development and Innovation, Acceptance and Solutions, Mastercard

Ten years ago, 85 percent of the world’s transactions were in cash and checks, and 2.5 billion people were unbanked. Since then, we’ve all been working hard as an industry to develop technology that will give the unbanked access to the world of digital payments. Mastercard has connected more than 360 million people to formal financial services – more than half-way to our commitment of reaching 500 million people by 2020. And the company has set a goal of connecting 40 million micro and small merchants to our payments network by 2021.

While more and more people and businesses are becoming “financially included,” there are still 2 billion people today who don’t have bank accounts, and over the last 10 years we’ve only managed to reduce cash usage by 2 percent. Up to now, we’ve been operating on the assumption that if we displace cash and simultaneously provide access to electronic payments, the unbanked will come. But, at this rate, financial inclusion for those remaining 2 billion people will take 200 years.

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Data from InterMedia reveal stagnant progress across key financial inclusion indicators in Nigeria

> Posted by Nadia van de Walle, Charles Wanga, and Ridhi Sahai, Financial Inclusion Insights, InterMedia

The number of adults who are considered financially included in Nigeria has not improved since 2014, according to InterMedia’s Financial Inclusion Insights (FII) 2016 Annual Report and Survey Data. The survey defines financial inclusion as adults with a registered account at a full-service financial institution. Financial inclusion in Nigeria dropped slightly from 37 percent in 2015 to 35 percent in 2016 (Figure 1), lagging behind the three other African countries surveyed as part of the FII program. In 2016, FII data showed 69 percent of Kenyans, 54 percent of Tanzanians, and 40 percent of Ugandans were financially included.

InterMedia recently completed and published the 2016 Annual Report and Survey Data on the status of financial inclusion in Nigeria. The report, based on a nationally-representative survey of over 6,000 Nigerian adults, provides insight into Nigerians’ financial lives while tracking trends in attitudes, access, use and demand for financial services.

(click to enlarge)

With an economy that is large enough to account for almost a third of Africa’s total GDP, why might Nigeria be lagging its peers?

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Designing a mobile money product that meets client needs while bringing tangible benefits to the financial institution

> Posted by Habiba Balogun, Habiba Balogun Consulting

The following is part of a blog series spotlighting views from participants in the Africa Board Fellowship (ABF). For more from Habiba, an interview with her can be found here.

With over 160 million mobile phones in use in Nigeria out of a population of 180 million, high mobile penetration is a major factor in the country in achieving seamless payments.

In 2016, at Accion Microfinance Bank (AMfB) in Nigeria, where I serve as a board member, we introduced a mobile banking product called Brighta 143. The product is USSD (unstructured supplementary service data), so it runs on both basic and smart phones, and it has shown great potential to expand financial inclusion as well as bring benefits to our institution.

But of course, rolling out a successful mobile money product is hardly straightforward.

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The views and opinions expressed on this blog, except where otherwise noted, are those of the authors and guest bloggers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Center for Financial Inclusion or its affiliates.