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100 Certified Seal Final - IBarres 4-24-2018Adapting Smart Certification for Digital Financial Services

>Posted by Alex Taylor, Marketing and Community Outreach Manager, Smart Campaign

This is the fourth in a series of blog posts exploring the impact of Smart Certification on the financial inclusion industry.

Since launching Smart Certification in 2013, we’ve witnessed rapid changes in the financial inclusion space driven by digitization of financial services and fragmentation of traditional business models. Nearly $100 billion in investment has flown into the global fintech market since 2010, creating an explosion of digital innovations and provider models. Our analysis of the Global Findex data shows that recent gains in inclusion have been largely driven by the rise of mobile money and digital payments.

Digital financial technology is central to making financial products more accessible to underserved people around the world. This is an exciting moment for digital finance, and an equally important for time for client protection. The industry has the opportunity to marry the client-centric approach embraced by so many fintechs and the industry-accepted consumer protection standards to develop quality products, build trust, and encourage usage. The Smart Campaign will leverage its experience to help lead the charge on this.

As we celebrate 100 Smart Certifications, we look forward to the next 100. Looking to the future requires defining responsible practices and standards given the technological advances that allow nearly instant access to credit, payments, savings, and insurance. The standards and the certification program must become more agile, mirroring the fast pace of change. We envision an adaptable approach that takes into consideration the product and client delivery mechanism, as well as the provider’s function in the value chain. The flexibility of this framework could eventually allow any type of provider to seek certification, but the process will begin with a focus on digital lenders and expand to encompass additional business models on a demand-driven basis.
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Woman holds POS device

Demand for credit in Africa exceeds supply, despite the rise in mobile money. Yet start-ups, growing daily in number, are at risk of accelerating over-indebtedness, by supplying credit to clients without conducting appropriate repayment capacity analysis. Digital lenders need to understand the risks of over-indebtedness from a client perspective, and algorithms need to evolve to take this into account. Regulation also must guide good practice for fintech digital lenders.
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> Posted by Danielle Piskadlo, Director, Investing in Inclusive Finance, Center for Financial Inclusion at Accion

The following is part of a blog series spotlighting views from participants in the Africa Board Fellowship (ABF).

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Two experiences with interest rate caps – in Kenya and Zambia – demonstrate the power of political forces to shape financial inclusion policies and may hold lessons for MSME lenders in other countries.

In a recent unpublished study, the Partnership for Responsible Financial Inclusion (formerly the Microfinance CEO Working Group) examined commonalities in the origins of interest rate caps in these two countries. In both cases, signs were clear that the general public was upset about the current state of loans and interest rates. Approaching elections increased the will among political leaders to make regulatory changes that would appeal to the public.

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Designing a mobile money product that meets client needs while bringing tangible benefits to the financial institution

> Posted by Habiba Balogun, Habiba Balogun Consulting

The following is part of a blog series spotlighting views from participants in the Africa Board Fellowship (ABF). For more from Habiba, an interview with her can be found here.

With over 160 million mobile phones in use in Nigeria out of a population of 180 million, high mobile penetration is a major factor in the country in achieving seamless payments.

In 2016, at Accion Microfinance Bank (AMfB) in Nigeria, where I serve as a board member, we introduced a mobile banking product called Brighta 143. The product is USSD (unstructured supplementary service data), so it runs on both basic and smart phones, and it has shown great potential to expand financial inclusion as well as bring benefits to our institution.

But of course, rolling out a successful mobile money product is hardly straightforward.

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We hope reading this post is just one of many activities you undertake today that acknowledge and celebrate the achievements of women. This International Women’s Day, we turned to a few of the women of CFI to share their thoughts on the gender gap facing lower income women around the world and ways to shift the balance in their favor.
 

Deborah Drake

Deborah Drake says, “International Women’s Day gives us a chance to appreciate the hard work and sacrifice women make every day for their families. It also highlights the challenges involved in giving women the opportunity for economic empowerment and the ability to make choices, including financial decisions for themselves and their families.” (As Vice President of CFI’s Investing in Inclusive Finance Program, Deborah leads the Africa Board Fellowship Program and the Financial Inclusion Equity Council.)
 
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> Posted by Lizzy Bolze, Project Specialist, Investing in Inclusive Finance, CFI

Digital trends in the African financial inclusion sector are evolving quickly. With the entrance of fintech startups and a more tech savvy client base, the role of corporate governance is more important than ever. As David Kombanie, Board Member of VisionFund put it: “Disruptive innovations are here with us. It’s change or die.”

Kombanie, along with more than 50 CEOs, board members, investors, fintech leaders, and regulators from Africa’s financial inclusion industry, engaged in a peer-learning exchange roundtable, Governing in a Digital World. This video provides an overview of discussions and key takeaways from the participants:

Governance for Financial Service Providers in a Digital World

The roundtable’s peer-to-peer exchanges provided three important governance considerations and recommendations for the boards of financial service providers (FSPs) as they evolve with the digital world:

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CEO of the largest investment firm asserts understanding social impact among most pressing issues facing investors today

> Posted by Lizzy Bolze, Project Specialist, Investing in Inclusive Finance, CFI

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Just prior to the global elite gathering at Davos, Larry Fink, Chairman and CEO of BlackRock investment firm wrote a letter to CEOs about the importance of long-term, sustainable strategy and understanding the social impact of the companies BlackRock and others invest in. He emphasizes that “Without a sense of purpose, no company, either public or private, can achieve its full potential.” As the largest investment firm, managing $6.3 trillion in assets, BlackRock’s message represents a social shift that blends the lines between impact investing and the profit-driven investment space. The letter sparked conversation and debate last week at the World Economic Forum in Davos where leaders across the investment, political, academic and public spheres met to discuss key global issues.

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> Posted by Richard Shumann, COO, the Vitas Group

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I learned a hard lesson in 1996. I was managing a provincial office for an international NGO, serving internally displaced people in southern Africa. I paid a surprise visit to a food distribution site, and saw beneficiaries were not getting their full rations. I checked the warehouse and discovered our food distribution manager had been selling food aid on the side. I informed the country director, and the distribution manager was fired. When I explained to my deputy what had happened, he shook his head and said, “The boss is always the last to know.”

As I worked in microfinance as a consultant, manager and board member, I worried about how CEOs, boards and shareholders learned what was really going on in their institutions, instead of just hoping managers got away from their desks, actually found fraud, and reported it.

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> Posted by Rachel Morpeth and Danielle Piskadlo, Analyst and Director of the Investing in Inclusive Finance program at the Center for Financial Inclusion at Accion 

The following post was originally published on the Microfinance Gateway.

As a hub of technology-based innovation, sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) leads the world in mobile money accounts. 12 percent of adults in the region have a mobile money account, compared to 2 percent globally. In a recent global survey measuring progress towards financial access and usage, five of the ten highest scoring economies hailed from SSA. However, financial exclusion remains acute.

The fact that most of Africa’s population lacks access to formal banking services but has one of the highest mobile penetration rates in the world provides the perfect breeding grounds for the use of financial technologies to grow a customer base. However, as disruptive technologies and business models continue to revolutionize the financial inclusion landscape in Africa, they present new challenges to leaders and boards.

These challenges can only be overcome through creative, forward-thinking solutions and active dialogues across governance bodies – boards and regulators. Board members, CEOs, regulators and fintechs will come together to advance these issues in Ethiopia on October 12-13 at the Center for Financial Inclusion at Accion’s (CFI) Governing in a Digital World roundtable, a side event to African Microfinance Week. In the meantime, let’s take a quick look at a few of the challenges to be discussed, and their respective solutions.

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> Posted by Lizzy Bolze, Project Specialist, Investing in Inclusive Finance, CFI

Board members and CEOs of MFIs in the MENA region met at the MENA Governance and Strategic Leadership Seminar hosted by CFI, Calmeadow and the Sanabel Network, in Jordan this March

Over the past few years, the financial inclusion landscape in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has rapidly evolved with new market entrants, changing regulations and increased financial risks. The industry aims to expand access to formal financial services and achieve much needed economic stability, and yet the financial inclusion ecosystem in MENA has experienced slower growth over the last 10 years compared to their peers in other parts of the developing world. According to reports by the World Bank and CGAP, microfinance institutions (MFIs) in MENA are currently reaching approximately 3 million borrowers, with a loan portfolio of over $2 billion — far below the market potential estimated at 56 million borrowers. The stakes are getting higher and MFIs need to reconsider their strategic directions in order to reach the unmet clients at the base of the economic pyramid.

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Credit Suisse is a founding sponsor of the Center for Financial Inclusion. The Credit Suisse Group Foundation looks to its philanthropic partners to foster research, innovation and constructive dialogue in order to spread best practices and develop new solutions for financial inclusion.

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The views and opinions expressed on this blog, except where otherwise noted, are those of the authors and guest bloggers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Center for Financial Inclusion or its affiliates.