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Capturing digital footprints using psychometrics can help FSPs reach the unbanked.

This post is one of five entries related to the report, Accelerating Financial Inclusion with New Data, a collaboration between CFI and the Institute of International Finance (IIF).

> By Rodrigo Sanabria, Partner Success Director, Latin America, LenddoEFL

LenddoEFL psychometric credit assessment field team

Field team testing its psychometric credit assessment in Mexico. Credit: LenddoEFL

In a recent post on her report, Accelerating Financial Inclusion with New Data, Tess Johnson highlighted the huge opportunity that alternative data represents for the future of financial services. The simple fact that mobile and internet penetration have surpassed financial services penetration in most emerging markets hints at a big opportunity: many people who have had no meaningful access to formal financial services are creating digital footprints financial service providers can capture and analyze to reach them with commercially viable services that help them improve their lives. This prospect is also made possible thanks to machine learning and big data methods that were not available to us a few years ago.

For those of us in the world of financial inclusion, these are very exciting times: the simultaneous emergence of online penetration and data analysis methods is generating an opportunity that our predecessors in this field couldn’t even have imagined.

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Strong board leadership can help reduce a financial service provider’s vulnerability to external shocks and enhance its resilience.

> Posted by Paul DiLeo, Founder and Managing Director of Grassroots Capital Management and Governance Expert for the Africa Board Fellows Program

30784872334_b499dfc281_mThe following is part of an Africa Board Fellowship blog series spotlighting the experiences of participants and reflections from industry experts.

In the previous blog in this series, we reframed external challenges as a “normal” part of doing business for financial service providers (FSPs) targeting the base of the pyramid. And based on insights from Africa Board Fellows, we looked at specific ways board members can anticipate and even shape the challenging aspects of their operating environment. However, while most boards have more potential for external influence than they often exercise, there are always external factors that cannot be controlled. Boards must also continually focus on reducing the FSP’s vulnerability and enhancing its resilience31479737602_1ed7a2ba32_k

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“Progress happens, just not according to our wishful time frames.” Greta Bull responds to CFI’s paper about the latest Findex data.

This post was originally published on the CGAP Blog and is re-published here with permission.

> By Greta Bull, CEO of CGAP and a Director at the World Bank Group

We can choose to see a glass as half empty or half full. And our perspective often has a lot to do with our initial assumptions.

Beth Rhyne and Sonja Kelly of the Center for Financial Inclusion (CFI) have generated discussion in the financial inclusion community with their paper exploring the latest Findex data, titled “Financial Inclusion Hype Versus Reality.” In the paper, Rhyne and Kelly express concern that the rate of access to new accounts slowed between 2014 and 2017 and that the usage gap for those accounts appears to be growing. They also highlight stagnation in the growth of credit and a decline in savings, but an increase in the use of payments. While I have very little to disagree with in their paper, I think the financial inclusion community has a lot more cause for optimism than it makes out.

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This blog from Accion in the U.S. was originally posted on NextBillion and is re-published here with permission.

By Gina Harman, CEO, Accion in the U.S., and Liz Urrutia, CEO, Opportunity International

The field of microfinance arose to address a pressing problem in emerging markets: Billions of people around the globe were shut out of, or poorly served by, the financial sector. But while microfinance institutions grew rapidly around the globe, so too did economic inequality in developed countries. It was within this context that organizations like Accion in the U.S. and Opportunity Fund adapted the microlending model to the United States more than two decades ago, expanding access to economic opportunity for entrepreneurs who lacked the financing and resources they needed to start or grow their businesses. In the ensuing years, the mission-based lending industry has continued to expand its services across the country – even in times of economic recession.

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30784872334_b499dfc281_mThe following is part of a blog series spotlighting the perspectives and experiences of CEOs and board members of financial institutions, as well as industry experts, who have participated in CFI’s Africa Board Fellowship program.

ABF Fellows discussion at table

ABF Fellows group discussion. November 2016.

> Posted by Danielle Piskadlo, Director, CFI

Few countries have escaped socio-political unrest, conflict or periods of crisis. As the consequences of such events can be severe for both financial service providers and their customers, it behooves every board and CEO to consider how they might prepare themselves to respond when the political environment around them deteriorates.

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30784872334_b499dfc281_mThe following is part of a blog series spotlighting the perspectives and experiences of CEOs and board members of financial institutions, as well as industry experts, who have participated in CFI’s Africa Board Fellowship program.

> Posted by Alexis Beggs Olsen, Consultant and CFI Fellow

The mention of overheated credit markets sends chills up the spine of anyone who lived through the crises in Bosnia, Andhra Pradesh, Morocco, or Nicaragua, where market saturation played a prominent role. While regulators and investors have key responsibilities in avoiding these crises, boards of financial service providers (FSPs) must also steer their organizations carefully when more companies enter the space to compete for the same customers. And since portfolio at risk at 30 days (PAR30) is a lagging indicator in the earlier stages of a credit market cycle—growth and high liquidity mask debt stress for a time—boards have to be more creative about how to understand what is actually happening.

Woman explains graphic harvest visualization of client centricity and competition.

We spoke with two Africa Board Fellowship alumni from Uganda, ECLOF Board Chairman Vincent Kaheeru and UGAFODE Board Member Olive Kabatalya, to capture their insights on governing in a competitive environment. “There are about 2,000 institutions [in Uganda] that could pass for microfinance institutions,” explained Vincent. “It’s quite a complicated market because there are both big and small players. Even the big banks target the smallest savers and borrowers.”

Based on their experience, Vincent and Olive offered other board members the following guidance:
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To require businesses to accept cash or not—that is the question.

> Posted by Sonja Kelly, Director of Research, CFI

handsome smiling african american barista taking cash payment on bar counter in cafe

In Washington, DC—where much of the CFI team is located—more and more restaurants and small businesses have moved away from cash—some going so far as to not accept cash at all. In response, according to the Washington Post, some city lawmakers have suggested a new law that would require businesses to accept cash as a form of payment. The proposal asserts that not accepting cash is a form of discrimination against the poor.

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What does it take to go from data silo to data flow?

> Posted by Ethan Loufield, Director of Strategy and Operations, CFI

This post is one of five entries related to the report “Accelerating Financial Inclusion with New Data,” a collaboration between CFI and the Institute of International Finance (IIF).”

One might think that with the explosion of new types of data and advanced analytics there would be an abundance of low-hanging fruit for financial service providers to feast on. While the excitement about the potential of non-traditional data may be justifiable, the reality is that the hard work of building the networks to derive value from such data is just getting underway. Just as the invention of the automobile required the development of roads, signage, lighting, laws and regulations, so too will data need its own groundwork before it can bring transformative change to the financial system and society at large.

Any change of this magnitude also requires large-scale collaboration to ensure that the infrastructure and standards put in place are broadly applicable across technologies, data types, industries and countries. As such, alongside the many in-house and bilateral initiatives afoot across various providers and markets, there needs to be a much more holistic and collaborative approach to developing data ecosystems that can align principles, practices and standards to facilitate the flow of data through value chains and across geographies.

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In the era of digital credit, we need not just new laws, but also new mental models for responsible digital credit provision.

> By John Owens, CFI Fellow

Responsible Digital_Credit Report CoverAs digital credit providers have grown exponentially over the past few years, and as digital products and models have proliferated, so too have concerns around consumer protection. In the recently published report, Responsible Digital Credit, I argue that ensuring that digital credit customers receive responsible treatment requires more than enhanced consumer protection laws and regulations. It also requires strong commitment from the digital credit industry. Finally, it needs consumers who are empowered to play a more proactive role in managing their digital credit responsibly.  Read the rest of this entry »

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Credit Suisse is a founding sponsor of the Center for Financial Inclusion. The Credit Suisse Group Foundation looks to its philanthropic partners to foster research, innovation and constructive dialogue in order to spread best practices and develop new solutions for financial inclusion.

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The views and opinions expressed on this blog, except where otherwise noted, are those of the authors and guest bloggers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Center for Financial Inclusion or its affiliates.