> Posted by Brianna Nelson, Project Associate, CFI

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The idea of customer-centricity doesn’t sound complicated. Shouldn’t every business be focused on its customers? However, even for businesses that do endorse a customer-centric approach, endorsement doesn’t necessarily translate into action. Financial service providers organize their businesses around their services. Even small tweaks to refocus the organization around the customer can require major institutional shifts.

Gerhard Coetzee, Senior Financial Sector Specialist at CGAP, recently presented at the Center for Financial Inclusion offices in Washington, D.C. on CGAP’s work on business models for customer-centricity. To assist institutions not only to prioritize but to effectively implement customer-centric products, CGAP is piloting a new tool to help financial providers better understand the complex needs of their customers.

In collaboration with LIVELABS, CGAP created the innovative Kaleido tool, a 360° customer profiling tool for designing financial services. The goal behind Kaleido is to understand and map the financial context of a household, which in turn provides valuable insights into the needs of clients. It is being piloted with Janalakshmi, an Indian financial service provider that serves over 1 million urban clients.

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> Posted by Susy Cheston, Senior Advisor, CFI

There was good news from the Alliance for Financial Inclusion (AFI) yesterday: the announcement of a partnership with MasterCard Worldwide to build technical capacity so that AFI members are better equipped to regulate innovations in products and business models.

Since its birth seven years ago, we have admired AFI for so effectively galvanizing a powerful regulator community to set a high bar on financial inclusion. Part of AFI’s strategy has been a fierce commitment to ownership of the issue by the regulators themselves. The results have been measured not only in dramatically increased access among AFI member countries, but also in higher standards around the quality of those services, as evidenced by Maya Commitments around client protection and financial capability. AFI Working Groups have also been developed for peer learning on digital financial services, financial inclusion data, and other key issues.

Yet we are among many in the industry who have felt that AFI’s circling of the wagons meant that their policy solutions were not always smart about encouraging innovation and investment in financial inclusion. To its credit, AFI got the message, and in 2014, it launched a Public-Private Dialogue Platform (PPD) to incentivize policymakers and regulators to cooperate with the private sector. Yesterday’s announcement about the new relationship with MasterCard is a strong next step toward realizing the PPD’s promise.

This trajectory resonates with recent interviews on client protection that we have carried out at FI2020. Among the regulators we interviewed, what was striking was the path many have followed toward empowering the private sector to play an active role in customer protection. We heard about a number of good practices that build capacity and break down communication silos between the public and private sectors.

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> Posted by Paul Breloff and Jeff Bond, Accion Venture Lab

Remittances are big business. This year, customers will send $454 billion to developing countries through formal channels alone. Developing countries’ income from remittances is three times bigger than the global aid budget. If you exclude China, remittance flows even outweigh foreign direct investment.

However, remittance services have never been known for great customer experience. Here’s why:

First, they’re expensive. At the end of 2014, the global average cost of sending remittances was just under 8 percent of the value sent. For less popular remittance corridors, rates climb well into the double digits and can reach over 20 percent.

Second, they’re inconvenient. Coordination between senders/receivers, locating branches to send and receive cash, paperwork and red tape, and long lines – these and other factors often make the experience of sending remittances pretty miserable.

But the world is changing. A convergence of forces offers the opportunity to rethink the traditional remittance model, promising more money, time, and peace of mind for customers. What’s new?

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> Posted by Center Staff

For financial inclusion enthusiasts the world over, this afternoon probably felt like Christmas morning/ your favorite time of the year. This afternoon the World Bank released the 2014 Global Findex, the world’s most comprehensive demand-side gauge of global progress in financial inclusion. As the first Global Findex was released in 2011, this second installment captures the past three years of financial inclusion developments, including the areas of account penetration, payments, savings, borrowing, and more. In total, almost 150,000 adults were surveyed from over 140 countries.

What was uncovered?

  • Account penetration increased by about 20 percent or 700 million adults, bringing the world’s banked rate from 51 to 62 percent, and the number of unbanked individuals from 2.5 billion to 2 billion.
  • Among the bottom 40 percent of the economic pyramid, account penetration increased by 17 percent, though more than half of the adults in this group remain unbanked.
  • The financial inclusion gender gap remained constant over the past three years at 7 percent, with 65 percent of men and 58 percent of women having a formal account in 2014.
  • The new data supports the hype behind mobile money – at least in sub-Saharan Africa, where 12 percent of adults have a mobile money account (compared to 2 percent globally) and 45 percent of these account holders rely on mobile alone for formal banking.

The CFI is thrilled to learn of the progress made in the past three years, especially in the finding that account penetration among the base of the economic pyramid increased so substantially. As the Global Findex points to growth in developing economies and innovations in technology as key drivers of recent inclusion, we’re confident about the advancements the next three years will bring.

For analysis and more findings, read the new report, The Global Findex Database 2014: Measuring Financial Inclusion Around the World. The Global Findex data itself is available to download, here. The World Bank data portal also includes infographics, data visualizations, and interactive dashboards.

Stay tuned to this blog in the days to come for more on the new Global Findex.

> Posted by Bobbi Gray, Research Director, Freedom from Hunger

While recent research indicates that access to and use of microcredit alone is not transformative for the average client served (see “Where Credit Is Due”), there has been very little discussion about the types of indicators being used to measure “transformation” in the ongoing debates. In fact, it seems that we all have accepted the general findings that microcredit has only had modest impacts on, along with other indicators of poverty and well-being, education, health, and social capital because the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have said so. There needs to be greater thought and debate about the choices of indicators used to support these conclusions.

Freedom from Hunger over the past 20-plus years has integrated health with microfinance and helped build a body of knowledge indicating that microfinance plus health services can enhance health outcomes. In an ongoing partnership with the Microcredit Summit Campaign, supported by Johnson and Johnson, we have pilot-tested a series of health indicators that financial service providers (FSPs) can use to track client health outcomes. This pilot test was built on years of experience of evaluating health outcomes with our FSP partners, as well as on similar experiences of developing common tracking indicators in the health sector. We created a list of criteria to assess the types of indicators we felt would be meaningful to track—for individuals with and without health services – which included dimensions of feasibility, usability, and reliability. Initial results have been shared in several webinars with SEEP and the Social Performance Task Force.

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> Posted by Center Staff

Unless you’re with one of the few organizations working to combat youth financial exclusion, you probably don’t hear much about the issue. A few weeks ago, the world celebrated Global Money Week, which is gaining encouraging participation and engagement. Sadly, aside from this annual blitz of activity, there isn’t much in the airwaves on expanding financial access to this hugely underserved client segment. According to the Global Findex, in higher-income countries, 42 percent of youth save in financial institutions. The next highest regions are East Asia & Pacific and sub-Saharan Africa, where this rate is 19 and 9 percent respectively. During our youth, financial services and financial education help us save for the future, form good money management behaviors, and navigate life transitions like getting an education and starting a family.

The MasterCard Foundation, as spotlighted in a recently released report, has been quietly busy these past seven years working to address this shortcoming. Since 2008, the Foundation in partnership with six organizations has worked with over 30 financial services providers and non-profits to expand youth access to banking services. The new report, Financial Services for Young People: Prospects and Challenges, reviews the MasterCard Foundation’s youth financial inclusion projects for insights and learning to inform future industry efforts.

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> Posted by Elisabeth Rhyne, Managing Director, CFI

The following post was originally published on the MasterCard Center for Inclusive Growth blog.

Reaching full financial inclusion by 2020 will require supportive policies in every country around the globe. The Economist Intelligence Unit’s “Global Microscope on Financial Inclusion, 2014” assesses the policy environment for financial inclusion in 55 countries. The Microscope examines 12 policy dimensions essential for creating an inclusion-friendly regulatory and institutional framework. The rigorous model incorporates input from hundreds of policy makers and participants in the financial sector and a review of existing policies and implementation. The resulting rankings represent the best readily available source for judging the state of financial inclusion policy around the world.

What’s surprising about the 2014 Microscope results is their wide range. Out of a possible 100 points, the top scorer (Peru) received 87 while the lowest (Haiti) earned only 16. If full inclusion requires good policies, it is disappointing to learn that the median score across all countries was a mediocre 46.

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> Posted by Rishabh Khosla, Senior Investment Analyst, Accion Venture Lab

The following post was originally published on SocialStory.

The Indian financial services landscape is undergoing a tectonic shift. The last few years have seen a renewed public focus on expanding financial inclusion. Building off prior programs, the government has invested in regulatory reform, improvements to the banking system, payments, and ID infrastructure. They have also announced a series of programs targeting the bottom of the pyramid (BoP) and micro, small, and medium enterprises (MSMEs). Simultaneously, we are beginning to see real shifts in the adoption of digital technologies and banking services (such as basic savings accounts and smartphones), driven by compelling use-cases, such as government subsidies, delivered directly into bank accounts, and rickshaw-hailing apps that use mobile wallets. Together these trends are unleashing tremendous innovation with the potential to speed financial inclusion for millions.

As investors in early and growth stage “social” enterprises that are speeding financial inclusion around the world, we believe startups are uniquely positioned to navigate this shifting technological, regulatory, and competitive environment. Indeed, financial sector reform in India has had many false starts, and there are still many regulatory and structural hurdles to be overcome. However, we believe India is nearing an inflection point with changes playing out in three areas that are giving birth to exciting startup financial services models: MSME finance, digital payments, and consumer services.

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> Posted by Shaheen Hasan, Manager, FI2020 at CFI

The Center for Financial Services Innovation (CFSI) has been leading the charge in the U.S. to move beyond traditional financial education toward models that help consumers translate financial knowledge into better financial behavior in their everyday lives. CFI interviewed Josh Sledge of CFSI to understand the trends shaping capability-building efforts in the United States.

What are signs that a financial capability framework is gaining traction in the United States?

CFSI works with a vast and diverse network that includes banks, credit unions, non-profits, financial technology companies, government agencies, and academics. Over the past several years, we’ve seen a shift in focus and approach among these various groups of stakeholders that reflects adoption of the financial capability framework. In other words, organizations and companies are increasingly placing an emphasis on helping consumers achieve real and meaningful financial behavior change.

Nonprofits and philanthropic organizations are pushing themselves to create deeper impact and experimenting with new strategies to do so. A wave of recent start-ups is employing technology to give users new products and tools for saving and managing money. Innovative banks are creating budgeting tools, introducing refined messaging, and forming partnerships to help customers better manage their money. We’ve been encouraged to see these developments as they demonstrate that the financial capability framework is taking hold. However, there is still plenty of room to go further.

Where is momentum stalling?

Scaling effective strategies for building financial capability has certainly been a challenge. We’re seeing new high-potential strategies emerge and practitioners and researchers taking a focused approach toward evaluating programs and products for their impact on financial behavior. Taken together, we’re poised to see the emergence of innovative but proven models for improving financial capability. This is a tremendous development, but the next step is implementing these models at scale in order to reach the millions of households that are struggling to manage their finances.

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> Posted by Joshua Goldstein, Principal Director for Economic Citizenship & Disability Inclusion, CFI

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“Customer-centric” is defined by businessdictionary.com “as creating a positive customer experience at the point of sale and post-sale.” Gerhard Coetzee, Senior Financial Sector Specialist at CGAP, and his team are exploring how customer-centricity can be best customized and then operationalized for low-income people, in particular the unbanked and clients of financial institutions (FIs), with a strong emphasis on “customer empowerment.” At a recent persuasive presentation at CFI, he discussed his approach.

The mandate of Coetzee’s study, launched last year, is to come up with a series of clear recommendations for financial service providers on how to give customers greater control over their financial destinies. Coetzee makes a strong case that “front-line staff” may do a poor job in communicating the advantages or disadvantage of one product over the other. But I believe that he should consider giving more weight to the pivotal role that well-trained and long-serving loans officers and other front line staff may play in an FI achieving customer-centricity.

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Credit Suisse is a founding sponsor of the Center for Financial Inclusion. The Credit Suisse Group Foundation looks to its philanthropic partners to foster research, innovation and constructive dialogue in order to spread best practices and develop new solutions for financial inclusion.

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The views and opinions expressed on this blog, except where otherwise noted, are those of the authors and guest bloggers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Center for Financial Inclusion or its affiliates.
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